lava lake

GLOSSARY OF VOLCANIC TERMS
A region typically within the summit of a shield volcano which contains partially crystallized or molten lava which lies immediately above a volcanic conduit which joins the lava lake to the magma chamber. Strong magma convection within volcanic conduits sustains lava lakes within their respective volcanic vents (Walker, 2000, p. 285).
\
USGS PHOTO GLOSSARY OF VOLCANIC TERMS
Lava lakes are large volumes of molten lava, usually basaltic, contained in a vent, crater, or broad depression. Scientists use the term to describe both lava lakes that are molten and those that are partly or completely solidified. Lava lakes can form (1) from one or more vents in a crater that erupts enough lava to partially fill the crater; (2) when lava pours into a crater or broad depression and partially fills the crater; and (3) atop a new vent that erupts lava continuously for a period of several weeks or more and slowly builds a crater higher and higher above the surrounding ground.
\
Photograph by E.W. Wolfe on 16 December 1986
Image shows an aerial view of a lava lake atop the Kupaianaha vent on the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The fume rising from the end of the narrow part of the lava lake marks the beginning of a lava tube.
\
Did you know?
Active lava lakes typically consist of a partially solidified shiny gray crust because its surface is constantly cooled by the atmosphere. The crust is seldom more than 5-30 cm thick, or more than a few minutes or hours old, because the crust continually circulates, breaks, and sinks into the moving molten lava below. The pattern of movement on the surface of lava lakes is often compared to the type of large-scale movement that occurs between the huge plates that make up the Earth's crust, including subduction, spreading, and strike-slip movement.
Lava lakes occur at relatively few volcanoes in the world. For example, since 1980, lava lakes have formed at Kilauea Volcano in Hawai`i, Mount Erebus in Antarctica (involving rare phonolitic lava), Erta' Ale in Ethiopia and Nyiragongo in Zaire.

Glossary of volcanic terms. - University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. . 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lava lake — Lava lakes are large volumes of molten lava, usually basaltic, contained in a vent, volcanic crater, or broad depression. Scientists use the term to describe both lava lakes that are molten and those that are partly or completely solidified. Lava …   Wikipedia

  • Lava Lake — Infobox lake lake name = Lava Lake image lake = Lava Lake, British Columbia.jpg caption lake = Satellite image of Lava Lake image bathymetry = caption bathymetry = location = British Columbia coords = type = inflow = outflow = catchment = basin… …   Wikipedia

  • lava lake — /ˈlavə leɪk/ (say lahvuh layk) noun a large volume of lava, either molten or solidified, lying in a crater, vent, or depression of a volcano …   Australian English dictionary

  • Lava — flow redirects here. For the programming anti pattern, see Lava flow (programming). For other uses, see Lava (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • Lava (disambiguation) — Lava may refer to: *Lava, hot molten rock *Lava (town), a town in West Bengal, India *Lava (Ramayana), one of the sons of Rama and Sita *Lava or Лава, the Russian name of Łyna river which flows through Poland and Russia *Lava (soap) *Laser… …   Wikipedia

  • Lake — For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). Oeschinen Lake in the Swiss Alps A lake is a body of relatively still fresh or salt water of considerable size, localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land. Lakes are inland and not part of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Lava Beds Wilderness — Lava Beds National Monument Lavafeld im National Monument …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lava Beds National Monument — Lavafeld im National Monument …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lake Toba — Landsat photo Location North Sumatra, Indonesia Coordinates …   Wikipedia

  • Lake Mashū — 摩周湖 View from Viewing Platform No. 1 (July 2008) Location Teshikaga, Hokkaidō, Japan Coordinates …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.